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Indigenous Design - Brigade Congress Day 2 - Gallery view
Em Burnett
05:00
Here’s the discourse post (which also links to the notes): https://discourse.codeforamerica.org/t/ka-maka-inana-towards-placed-based-human-centered-and-indigenous-design-brigade-congress-2020/916
Will Pfeffer (he/him; CfA Network Team)
06:54
You can find our Code of Conduct at https://c4a.me/coc
Will Pfeffer (he/him; CfA Network Team)
07:28
To reach out for Code of Conduct concerns, feel free to message me directly here in chat, or send an email to safespace@codeforamerica.org
Mondy
09:47
Kumu.io https://kumu.io/bentut/ka-maka-ʻinana-code-for-america-brigade-congress#prework
Marion Ano
12:10
Aloha e nā hoaaloha (friends) So excited to learn!
Mondy
12:38
Aloha e Marion!
Diane O'Neal (she, her)
12:58
Mahalo Ben
kamu enos
16:55
Mahalo Ben!
Diane O'Neal (she, her)
20:12
Diane, Richmond Virginia, to be fulfilled in life
Heather [she/her]
20:18
I'm Heather. I am of Greek and Jewish decent, but was raised secular.
Jess Sand
20:24
1. From Oakland, city rooted in generational experiences that have managed to hold even in the face of gentrification.
Jess Sand
20:41
Something my parents wanted: to make an impact on my world.
Mondy
20:57
Mahalo Jess! All, please respond in the Chat1. What is something special about where you are from?2. What is something your parents or grandparents wanted for you?
kamu enos
20:59
kamuela joseph kauwaenaikapohiwanui enos. restore ancestral abundance. waianae/waipo oahu hawaii
Stephanie Chang
21:15
hello! aloha ~ in the community i live, there are tons of fruit trees! which i love. My parents wanted us to get a great education. was their values, and they felt it was a starting point to living an independent life
Alison Link
21:20
1. Something special about Minnesota is that we live among lakes, and along rivers (like the MIssissippi)! 2. Something my parents wanted was for me was to have many opportunities for me to be a learner.
Dan Stormont (he/him) - Code for Tucson
21:44
I am originally from LA - a land with a long history of peoples who have occupied that space. My parents wanted me to get an education (I did) and make an impact in the world (still working on that).
Diana Varnes
21:47
1. I live in Oklahoma, and while I come from Swedish farmers who immigrated during the Homestead Act, I feel blessed to live in such a culturally rich land as Oklahoma, and the endless opportunities I have to learn how to be an ally to so many different people.2. I don't know what my parents or grandparents want from me, so I try to live my life in a way that I hope would make them proud.
Ryan B. Harvey (he/him, Code for New Orleans)
21:51
I am from New Orleans, a place full of life and music with an inclination toward the celebration of anything. My parents wanted (and still want) for me to make the lives of the people around me better every day.
Betsy Valu Rohney2
21:58
Betsy Valu Rohney (she/her)! I'm of Polynesian (Tongan) & European descent. Bay Area, CA (Ohlone land). My grandparents wanted me to thrive and be connected anywhere I am
Alyx Perry1
22:35
Southern Appalachians: afro-celtic-Cherokee. these days, my parents just want me to survive.
elburnett
22:44
Em, Portland Maine. The air is salty here and we have very strong tides. I live on Wabanaki land. My grandmothers wanted me to have a voice.
Mondy
23:28
1. I am Mondy Jamshidi Kent, originally of Michigan, now Hawaii. In Michigan where I am from we are named for the quality of our waters and I noticed a similarity in Hawaii. 2. To honor a multicultural, international mindset (driven by story and National Geographic)
Pamela @CfG (SC)
24:30
Pamela - born Ankara, Turkey - roots New England Swedish/Welch + Appalachian TN Scottish/Cherokee - grew up in suburb of DC - my parents both grew up poor and valued education.
Marion Ano
24:31
Aloha mai kākou, O wau o Marion Ano. Noho mai ma Nuʻuanu I Oʻahu nei. My name is Marion Ano, I live in Nuʻuanu on Oʻahu. One of the most amazing things about Nuʻuanu are the ancient ʻauwai that I grew up around: https://www.hawaiimagazine.com/content/flowing-waters
ktoney01
24:40
Which Impact Investor did you speak with in PA?
Curtis Kozielec
25:25
Where I grew up (NJ) was very culturally mixed, which I found interesting and very good in being exposed to and then understanding different traditions/perspectives. My family always encouraged exploration (purposely take a wrong turn and see where it goes...for a silly example, pre-GPS) in all aspects of life
Stephanie Chang
28:27
Alec can you share these value propositions that led to founding the Ka maka inane program?
Stephanie Chang
28:51
can you paste here if possible. wanted to see them again
Mondy
28:54
ʻāina: Kona region of OʻahuSTAKEHOLDERʻāina: Kona region of Oʻahu<small>Stakeholder</small>The Kona Region of the Hawaiian Island of O`ahuDirectionally positioned according to land and sky, the Kona region bears its name driving from the positionally of this quadrant of the island marked also by the windward-faced defining mountain range, aptly named the Ko`olau.http://archive.hokulea.com/ike/hookele/star_compasses.html
Alec Wagner (he/him)
29:40
VP’s: Focused on Land and People, equallyHad different methodologies, depending on what community you are inWas designed by the community that would use this and based on the practices “indigenous” to that community, historicallyAnd was “Living” - something that could be iterated democratically over time so it stays relevant with the changing times and improves
ktoney01
30:08
@AlecWagner Thank you!
Stephanie Chang
30:22
thanks Alec!!!
Diana Varnes
33:09
2. I texted my aunt who knew my parents and grandparents, and she said they wanted me to be happy and myself.
ktoney01
33:11
Emptying your now
kamu enos
33:22
na`au: seat of learning.
Betsy Valu Rohney2
33:31
love that!
Mondy
33:34
Na`u - mahalo, Kumu
Stephanie Chang
33:38
emptying your na’au (yes thanks Kamu)
Mondy
33:48
*Na’au
Mondy
34:26
That’s awesome, Diana <3
Stephanie Chang
35:00
when we “arrive” at answers before going through a process that invites all ideas
Mondy
35:16
You said it!
Mondy
35:19
:)
Jess Sand
35:50
We recently (painfully) decommissioned a project that was potentially harming community members because we hadn’t been intentional in the development process or included enough voices. We’re still working through the consequences.
Dan Stormont (he/him) - Code for Tucson
35:51
I think I mostly have negative examples where the process seemed too transactional and didn't engage the community we were trying to work with.
Mondy
36:37
Mahalo Stephanie, Jess and Dan. These are powerful examples.
Dan Stormont (he/him) - Code for Tucson
36:39
That does sound painful, @Jess.
Heather [she/her]
37:09
Well, as I've said before, mistakes are how you learn.
Mondy
37:20
Question again, please respond in the Chat:When has a design process challenged your beliefs? When has it not felt right?
Jess Sand
37:24
We are learning TONS
Diana Varnes
38:02
I'm still learning about design process
Stephanie Chang
38:23
The prompts we used which we all found powerful was: “What is the story of your name?” and “What is the story of your community?” awesome prompts.
Mondy
39:17
@Diana - That’s a perfect place to be. It means we may be open to inclusivity or alternate models, IMO
Jess Sand
40:05
Similar, Diana, including how the design methodologies I’ve been taught may not always be the most appropriate approaches to use in any given circumstance/project
Heather [she/her]
40:12
The whole question about "the story of your name" can get complicated, especially when one uses a name other than the one they were given at birth. (For example, transgender people who chose to adopt a name of their identified gender.)
Dan Stormont (he/him) - Code for Tucson
41:25
It seems like that would make for a great story, Heather. My daughter changed her given name and her choices reveal a lot about her.
kamu enos
41:42
yes heather. ill unpack that idea in my component
Stephanie Chang
41:44
YES! heather. gives an opportunity for someone to share that. or offer something more “standard” if that’s their comfort level
Mondy
42:00
You’re exactly right, Heather. As we share the story of our name it’s related as we get into the genealogy of our connection to place as well as who we bring into the space with ourselves as a vehicle
Betsy Valu Rohney2
42:16
yes, heather agreed.
Mondy
42:25
That includes our journey and lens, and also how we establish identity
kamu enos
42:42
they question would not be asked w/out creating a space of intention and care first.
kamu enos
42:50
*that question.
Dan Stormont (he/him) - Code for Tucson
43:00
"Journey and lens" - love it, Mondy!
Heather [she/her]
43:06
Also, don't forget that one's choice of pronouns are also an important part of one's identity.
Mondy
43:21
^^ Mahalo Kumu - absolutely.
Stephanie Chang
43:24
👍
kamu enos
43:33
we held it as the name you chose to share.
kamu enos
43:46
and what is its story.
kamu enos
43:54
ill go over.
Mondy
44:30
Mahalo @Dan. There will be more shared on this in the Kumu.io and feel free to reach out to us for more depth on this.
Mondy
44:50
Perfect! Mahalo Kamu
Dan Stormont (he/him) - Code for Tucson
44:54
Will do, Mondy.
Mondy
46:53
@Alec shared about Ahupuaʻa land management system.
Mondy
47:10
Say that again! :)
Alec Wagner (he/him)
47:28
Technologies of ancestral biosystems management
Mondy
47:37
phew say that 5 times fast
Mondy
47:42
That’s profound
Kelly Toney
47:59
https://www.uhfoundation.org/impact/research/indigenous-innovation-create-knew-futures
Ben Treviño (he/him)
48:22
Will link on kumu.io to more information about ahupua’a from a lightning from 2019 Brigade Congress
Mondy
48:56
Awesome Ben! Mahalo Kelly! Also on Kumu.io
Mondy
50:14
Ma`o Farms in Waianae
Jess Sand
50:15
“Intimacy is equity” 🙏
Alison Link
50:22
I have struggled a lot with the concepts of “startup” and “innovation”—especially because these can be such loaded concepts within the technology industry. I am curious how to frame spaces that have discovery and learning as goals, but that do not necessarily expect something new to “startup” or some kind of “innovation” as a result. I am curious how brigades can get people excited to come together with alternative framings of purpose. (For example: rediscovering preexisting wisdom, amplifying existing work, failing with purpose, storytelling, etc.) I appreciate the depth you are bringing to the idea of “innovation” here!
Marion Ano
50:37
@Kamu - “Not adjacent to power” - Eo!
Dan Stormont (he/him) - Code for Tucson
51:05
+1 Alison!
Jess Sand
51:09
@Alison We’re struggling with this, too. Trying to help members reflect on existing projects with a new les.
Jess Sand
51:12
lens
Heather [she/her]
51:14
"failing with purpose" I like that phrase!
Stephanie Chang
51:17
“intimacy leads to equity” so interesting idea.
Mondy
51:50
Thus - (K)new Futures:) The starting point of engagement matters and how we conduct ourselves with one another.
Mondy
51:58
I like that @Stephanie
Mondy
52:18
“What give do you bring to this calling” - wow
Mondy
52:24
*gift
Marion Ano
52:24
“What gifts do you bring”
Ethan McElvaney - Code for Durham 3:(
52:24
I love the “intimacy leads to equity” quote, I think much of our inequity lies in not knowing enough people who aren’t like us
Betsy Valu Rohney2
52:48
mahalo, kamu. excellent points!
Heather [she/her]
52:59
@Ethan Yes!
Ethan McElvaney - Code for Durham 3:(
53:34
This has been a great panel; I came in late, but what I heard and saw was brilliant
Jess Sand
53:59
+1000
Marion Ano
54:01
@Brigade Congress 2020 Planning Team - BIG MAHALO
Diana Varnes
54:08
Mahalo everyone, these conversations have been a blessing
Kelly Toney
55:14
stack
Brendan Babb
55:23
Whoops the number ends as 5263
Brendan Babb
55:35
1-855-917-5263
Mondy
55:38
Hi Brendan thanks!
Stephanie Chang
55:53
Kamu can you share the e prompts? what is the origin of your name? what is the gift you bring to this calling. what wha the second one? mahalo!
Dan Stormont (he/him) - Code for Tucson
55:54
Feel sorry for whoever has the 5363 number! :)
Mondy
56:27
Such a gracious and insightful group! Mahalo everyone for joining the conversation.
kamu enos
58:11
Stephanie: the practices is derived from Aunty Puanani Burgess: http://maui.hawaii.edu/pd/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2018/09/Burgess-Puanani-Building-the-Beloved-Community-A-Life-Pracrtice.pdf
Stephanie Chang
58:26
👍👍👍 thanks Kamu
Mondy
58:27
Mahalo Kamu!
Ben Treviño (he/him)
58:52
Understanding Principles
Mondy
59:32
“The practices is derived from Aunty Puanani Burgess: http://maui.hawaii.edu/pd/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2018/09/Burgess-Puanani-Building-the-Beloved-Community-A-Life-Pracrtice.pdf”
Dan Stormont (he/him) - Code for Tucson
59:45
So true, Kamu!
Betsy Valu Rohney2
01:01:03
Mahalo & Malo aupito to everyone for sharing your experiences and knowledge.
Mondy
01:01:05
Please follow up with us: Here’s the discourse post (which also links to the notes): https://discourse.codeforamerica.org/t/ka-maka-inana-towards-placed-based-human-centered-and-indigenous-design-brigade-congress-2020/916
Diane O'Neal (she, her)
01:01:10
Kamu, what is the word for burden?
Diane O'Neal (she, her)
01:01:13
kama?
Jess Sand
01:01:45
Thank you all!!
Brendan Babb
01:01:49
Thank you all
Ethan McElvaney - Code for Durham 3:(
01:01:55
Thank y’all!
Dan Stormont (he/him) - Code for Tucson
01:02:00
Thank you all! This was so great!
Marion Ano
01:02:01
ALOHA!
Pamela @CfG (SC)
01:02:04
👏🏼👏🏼